Leo Schofield AM Presents Paris Opera Ballet: LE PARC – POSTPONED

Leo Schofield AM Presents Paris Opera Ballet: LE PARC – POSTPONED

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED – ALL TICKET HOLDERS WILL BE CONTACTED SHORTLY

For The Friends of The Australian Ballet in association with Palace Opera & Ballet

Join ballet aficionado Leo Schofield AM for a pre-screening presentation of Le Parc, a Ballet in three acts, specifically created for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1994 by choreographer Angelin Preljocaj.

Preljocaj explores the laws of attraction and the games we play, finding a subtle balance between the classical genius of Mozart’s music and the modernity of his choreographic language.

Thierry Leproust’s perfectly chiselled sets evoke the elegance and refinement of a French style garden while Hervé Pierre’s costumes draw inspiration from the Age of Enlightenment.

Advancing to the caprices of an imaginary Carte du Tendre and guided by strange gardeners, the dancers awaken to love, from first encounters to seduction, from timidity to attraction, from resistance to the sweet appeal of abandon in sublimely soaring “pas de deux”. Even today, this timeless work continues to explore the codes of love and the way human feelings develop.

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Five Reasons to see Le Parc

Five Reasons to see Le Parc

Created specifically for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1994 by choreographer Angelin Preljocal, there are countless reasons why Le Parc has become a timeless classic.

CARDS
When desire is part of the game, the carte du Tendre is also a card to play. Love at first sight and gambles come together in the groves of Le Parc. Marivaux like, Preljocaj’s choreography – created in 1994 for the Paris Opera Ballet – reshuffles the cards for the game of love and chance.

MOZART
Female desire (Così fan tutte), debauchery (Don Giovanni) and true love (Die Zauberflöte): Mozart’s scores form the soundtrack for the century of Laclos, Sade, Crébillon and Vivant Denon. In Le Parc, Mozart is Preljocaj’s musical accomplice: concertos, quartets and symphonies give rhythm to a work that gives form to the desires of the heart and mind.

GARDENS
Be it the gardens of the carte du Tendre – the landscape of love charted out by Madame de Scudéry or the royal alleys at Versailles where Le Nôtre created the ideal backdrop for all things playful, the garden is above all a secret one when it comes to love.

QUARTET
“Divertimento”, “A Musical Joke”, “Serenade”, “A little Night Music”: the pages from Mozart selected by Angelin Preljocaj evoke hours of the day and night – moments in a sophisticated art of loving. Music and dance echo one another: in a conversation transposed into sound, a quartet of gardeners reply to a string quartet. Set to an electronic score by Goran Vejvoda, these little cupids guide the dancers along in a timeless game.

ERA
The society of the age of Enlightenment has given way to an entertainment based one: “The world parades and surges across the small screen”, says Preljocaj, “and we remain transfixed”. And yet, as the French writer Philippe Sollers says, the 18th century was a “forward” one. With Le Parc, the choreographer draws on the source of French libertinage. Dance finds new momentum that brings into perspective the games of seduction of our times.

“A masterpiece. There are dances that entertain us, and then there are a few that have the power to truly move us.” Alexandra Desvignes, BACHTRACK

Join ballet aficionado Leo Schofield for a pre-screening presentation of Le Parc on 18 July at Palace Cinemas Verona to hear why Leo thinks Le Parc is a masterpiece of dance.

Tickets on sale now

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Image courtesy Paris Opera Ballet

Butterfly comes to Sydney

Butterfly comes to Sydney

The Australian Ballet School will soon be returning to Sydney to present Butterfly, their first new production in 18 years.

A modern fairy tale told through movement, Butterfly will feature 100 full-time students of The Australian Ballet School, showcasing the next generation of emerging Australian dance artists.

Choreographed by former graduate Lucas Jervies and created in the studios of The Australian Ballet School, Butterfly beautifully blends themes of realism and magic with classic and contemporary techniques. Designed to appeal to all ages, the original production will be brought to life by the extraordinary artistry of pre-professional dancers and will transport audiences to another world through the transformative sets and costumes by revered designer Hugh Colman.

Set to the joyous score Le Papillon (The Butterfly) by Jacques Offenbach, Butterfly is a tale that follows a young boy who vies for the attention of the smartest girl in school. On an excursion to the butterfly enclosure at the Zoo, they immerse themselves in the kingdom of butterflies, momentarily forgetting the world outside and embarking on a magical journey.

Butterfly will take flight at The Concourse in Chatswood for three performances on 2 – 3 July and we are thrilled to be presenting opportunities for members to engage with creatives from the School.

Pre-Performance Drinks with Lucas Jervies 
12.15pm Saturday 3 July | The Concourse Theatre

Join us for pre-performance drinks in The Concourse Theatre Foyer. Catch up with other members over a glass of bubbles and chat with Lucas Jervies about the process of creating Butterfly for the ABS before watching the matinee performance.

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Members Only – Chairman’s Dinner with Lisa Pavane, Lucas Jervies, Hugh Colman
6pm Tuesday 29 June | The Concourse + Mama Mulan

Watch half an hour of student from the ABS rehearse on stage at The Concourse before joining us for an intimate dinner hosted by Friends Chairperson Greg Khoury. While enjoying a delicious Chinese banquet in a private dining room at Mama Mulan, Greg will lead discussion with Lisa, Lucas and Hugh.

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Tickets for other Sydney performances are on sale now and can be purchased via Ticketek.

How does a moment last forever? Our Pre-Performance Sylvia Talk with Sculptor Linda Klarfeld.

How does a moment last forever? Our Pre-Performance Sylvia Talk with Sculptor Linda Klarfeld.

As audience members, we usually gawk at a dancer’s consecutive turns and flying leaps, but from the perspective of sculptor Linda Klarfeld, it is the intricate and fast-moving positions of a dancer that she wishes to immortalise in bronze. Before our Sylvia Dress Rehearsal performance, we were honoured to have Linda Klarfield, a celebrated Australian sculptor to talk about how she intertwined her artistic gifts and her admiration of ballet in her 6 dance-inspired bronze sculptures. In this talk, her sculptures were brought to life by two talented young students from Allegria Dance Studio.

Her talk detailed her tedious process of sculpting and modelling, of her obsessive observation with the placing of an index finger, or the positioning of a hip bone. Her artworks capture positions that are impossible to hold, as Linda described that her bronze sculptures will stay ‘en pointe’ for 2000 years. As she was never a professional dancer, she leaned on the technical eye of David McAllister and Robert Albert to critique and examine her plasticine sculptures before casting them in rubber/plaster moulds. Using these moulds, she would cast the sculptures in wax and detail any imperfections. At one point, she recalled she had been so obsessive in perfecting the detailing of the hands and materials, she had overlooked that she had cast a dancer with (literally) two left feet. After creating a ceramic mould with the wax sculptures, she would melt out the wax and pour in the bronze.

Bronze is characterized by permanence and strength; hence, Linda relies on it to hold impossible poses with impeccable balance. In her statue of the pas de deux from Giselle, she highlights how her greatest challenge was locating the position’s centre of gravity. In this statue, the ballerina is not yet at the top of her lift, and Linda explains that she located the centre of gravity as being slightly off-centre, as the two dancers pull up and away from each other to maintain balance. We have all seen these lifts in arabesque, with the risen leg stretching through a 90-degree angle, however, the eye always misses the moments before the picture. Linda’s sculptures make that moment tangible to help incite a feeling of excitement about what is about to happen, to bring the sculptures to life in what feels like a real-life pas de deux.

 

This whole process would take around 6 months for every sculpture, however, in every finished result, you can clearly see the admiration and dedication Linda has for her dancers and her art. We thank her for sharing her unique insight into the world of sculpting and ballet with our members, and commend her on her beautiful artworks.

 

Sculptor Linda Klarfeld

 

All photos were taken by Lexy Potts.

The Nutcracker Dress Rehearsal

The Nutcracker Dress Rehearsal

The final dress rehearsal for The Australian Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker, the ultimate Christmas Ballet in its most enchanting version.

There’s nothing like a traditional Nutcracker to get you in the mood for the festive season. And there’s no traditional Nutcracker as magical as Peter Wright’s.

The artistic director of Birmingham Royal Ballet has created a gold-standard production of this beloved party piece, remaining faithful to the feel of the 19th-century original. Tchaikovsky’s last great score for ballet, with its lively motifs and bewitching melodies, draws us into the story of Clara, a young ballet student celebrating with her family on Christmas Eve. When the clock strikes twelve, we enter the realm of dream … and Clara is whisked to the Land of Sweets in the arms of her Nutcracker Prince.

Veteran designer John F Macfarlane exquisitely evokes the world of this picture-perfect ballet: whirling snowflakes, crackling fires, band-box soldiers, a Christmas tree that grows until it brushes the ceiling and a Sugar Plum Fairy in luscious candy-floss pink.

With the holidays around the corner, there’s no better way than The Nutcracker to rediscover the childlike joys of the season, or to create your own family tradition.

Tickets on sale from Monday 23 September.

If you do not wish to book tickets online, please download our booking form here and return to the FAB office by email or post.

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