A Virtual Night at the Ballet

A Virtual Night at the Ballet

A VIRTUAL NIGHT AT THE BALLET
GRAEME MURPHY’S SWAN LAKE

In recognition of your ongoing support of The Friends of The Australian Ballet we invite you and your household to join us for
The Australian Ballet’s inaugural online event, A Virtual Night at the Ballet.

You will be treated to a live and interactive pre-performance talk with creator Graeme Murphy AO where we will explore his legendary production of
Swan Lake, followed by a screening of the performance via The Australian Ballet’s Ballet TV.

 

Thursday 2 July

7pm Pre-Performance Talk and Q&A
Hosted by Brooke Lockett with Special Guest Graeme Murphy AO

7.30pm Swan Lake

Dress Code
Your finest video conference attire

 

RSVP by Monday 29 June

Last Name:

Email address:

 

Event access details will be emailed to guests at 5pm Thursday 2 July.
Footloose with Friends

Footloose with Friends

Grab your popcorn and join FAB for something entirely fun and frivolous. This weekend we are inviting members with a Netflix account to join our watch party. Utilising Netflix Party, we will create a virtual lounge room complete with the novelty of a chat function so Friends can enjoy the 1980s dance movie Footloose together from home.

Information on how to join the watch party will only be emailed to those who register. You will need to install Netflix Party and have an active Netflix account to join.

Register now for this Saturdays free 20 June 6pm Footloose watch party on Netflix with FAB

 

Last Name:

Email address:

 

About Footloose

Footloose is a 1984 American musical drama film directed by Herbert Ross. Moving in from Chicago, newcomer Ren McCormack (Kevin Bacon) is in shock when he discovers the small Midwestern town he now calls home has made dancing and rock music illegal. As he struggles to fit in, Ren faces an uphill battle to change things. With the help of his new friend, Willard Hewitt (Christopher Penn), and defiant teen Ariel Moore (Lori Singer), he might loosen up this conservative town. But Ariel’s influential father, Reverend Shaw Moore (John Lithgow), stands in the way.

 

About Netflix Party

Netflix Party is a Google Chrome extension that allows you to watch Netflix with your friends online. Netflix Party synchronizes video playback and adds group chat to your favorite Netflix shows. A guide to using Netflix Party will be emailed to those who register for Footloose with Friends. To join our Watch Party you will need to install Netflix Party and have an active Netflix account.

 

If you’re not a Footloose fan, click here for FAB’s list of top ballet films to loose yourself in this weekend.

COVID-19 Update

In view of the NSW Government’s directive that all non-essential gatherings of 500 people or more are banned between March 16th 2020 until June 14th 2020, The Australian Ballet will not proceed with its performances of Volt (3 – 22 April 2020) and Anna Karenina (30 April – 18 May 2020) at Sydney Opera House. We, therefore, regret to announce that all Friends of The Australian Ballet events have been cancelled until further notice.

While this is extremely disappointing to us all, we hope you will understand that the health and safety of our members is our top priority.

However, as we are a small not-for-profit organisation, this decision has greatly affected the ongoing operations of The Friends of The Australian Ballet.  Our main source of income is derived from our dress rehearsal ticket sales and your ongoing support. We are currently working with our board to review our operations to ensure we can continue to share our love and joy of ballet with you well into the future.

If you have purchased tickets to attend any of our future events, including Volt, Anna Karenina, Meet the New Dancers, and Friends in Conversation with Chris Yates, we will be contacting all ticket holders separately and will offer the following options:

  • Donate your ticket purchase to The Friends of The Australian Ballet
  • Keep a credit for a future performance
  • A full refund of the ticket value

The Friends has always relied on the generous support of our members. If you are able, we ask you to consider donating your ticket purchase so we can continue to provide unique events and experiences to our dedicated community of ballet lovers well into the future.

If you select a credit, exchange or a refund, we will aim to process your request within 10 business days.

Please refrain from calling our office due to high demand and staff working from home.

Please contact us through admin@fab.org.au and we will be posting regular updates on social media (Facebook and Instagram) as well as www.fab.org.au

We thank you for your patience and understanding during this difficult time.

With kind regards,

The Office of The Friends of The Australian Ballet

Q+A with Alexander Phoon

If you were at the dress rehearsal for The Australian Ballet’s production of Sylvia you might have noticed a few guest artists on stage – and we’re not just talking about Misty Copeland. Alexander Phoon, a young dance student, was cast as one of the adorable, scene-stealing cherubs. Alexander, and his mum Catherine, are both members of the Friends and we are beyond thrilled that we got to see him on stage with The Australian Ballet for the first time.

We asked Alexander a few questions about ballet and how he got involved with Sylvia.

When did you start dancing and where do you currently learn?

I started dance at the age of eight and I currently dance at The McDonald College.

What made you want to start dancing? Why do you love it?

I started dancing because I have always been inspired by performing arts, although after watching The Australian Ballet I immediately knew that one day I would be a ballet dancer.

How did you get involved with Sylvia and The Australian Ballet?

Through The McDonald College – I was lucky enough to be able to apply for the show and the next day I was informed that I had successfully been accepted.

How long were you rehearsing for Sylvia?

I was rehearsing for Sylvia for around just a week.

What is your favourite part of Sylvia? Is there a particular dance or movement you love? And favourite character?

My favourite part of Sylvia is the feeling when get to go on stage and the experience of being able to work alongside the company. My favourite character would have to be Eros as he does an amazing solo and is a very energetic character.

Who’s your male principle dancer with The Australian Ballet?

My favourite male dancer in the company is definitely Chengwu Guo because of his outstanding athleticism, ability and determination.

 What’s your favourite ballet and why?

My all time favourite ballet is definitely Alices’ Adventures in Wonderland by Christopher Wheeldon as it has a lot of excitement and interesting characters. The choreography for the ballet is amazing too.

Brunch with the Ballet

Brunch with the Ballet

Brunch with the Ballet
Review by Deb Wright – FAB Member since 2018

One of the aspects I most value of being a member of the Friends of the Australian Ballet is the wonderful opportunity you have of an intimate glimpse behind the scenes. The recent Brunch with the Ballet, held at Sydney’s Four Seasons Hotel, was just that. The room was elegant, food and beverage selection delicious and the Special Guests captivating.

We were treated to a charming performance by the Sydney City Ballet under the direction of Lucinda Dunn OAM, who was The Australian Ballet’s longest-serving ballerina.

Dancer from the Sydney City Ballet

David McAllister AM, the Artistic Director of The Australian Ballet headed up the special guests on this occasion. He has announced that he will be stepping down from this role at the end of 2020 and spoke very openly with us about his decision to do this. He has been Artistic Director for two decades, after beginning his career with The Australian Ballet in 1983. He touched on many of the highlights of his career and spoke about some of the great opportunities he has had with the company, both as a dancer and as Artistic Director.

David McAllister, Greg Khoury and emcee Susie Smither

After the main course was served, David and Musette Molyneaux, the Head of Costume Wardrobe for The Australian Ballet gave us some insight into how ballet costumes are designed. The choreography of the ballet often dictates how the costume will work best and the design process is done in close collaboration with the dancers . Once the design has been finalised Musette and her team of skilled artisans then set to work to produce these incredible tutus that are strong enough to endure for several seasons but look fragile and magical to the audience. Each tutu has many different fastenings to accommodate the different sizes of the dancers who will wear the costume.

Dancers from Sydney City Ballet modelling tutus

While David and Musette reminisced about some of their favourite costumes, the dancers from Sydney City Ballet modelled tutus from The Australian Ballet’s archives including some from The Sleeping Beauty. The dancers moved around the room, so that everyone had a chance to see the tutus and headpieces up close, to study the fine beading and embroidery. Each one is exquisite and to see them worn by the dancers made them come alive. Being so close to these beautiful creations was a very unexpected and memorable delight.

David McAllister and Musette Molyneaux in conversation

The Friends of the Australian Ballet is the principle support group in NSW for The Australian Ballet and ach year they raise funds for a scholarship for an aspiring dancer from The Australian Ballet School. This year’s recipient was Belle Urwin and although she could not be there to receive it in person due to being on tour, her mother and father Rob and Alison Urwin attended the Brunch to accept the award on her behalf.  Rob gave us a wonderful insight into what it takes to support a child who has his or her sights set on a career in Dance and the sacrifices that are made by all members of the family not just the dancer herself.

Tanya Barrington presenting scholarship cheque to Rob and Alison Urwin

The Brunch with the Ballet is a fundraising event and there were some wonderful items to be won in the draw and the silent auction including a beautiful print of a dancer by Robert Dickerson.

A very enjoyable afternoon was had by all. I left the room having been treated to something very special and in the knowledge that I had been able to share the experience with a group of like-minded people. Friends of the Australian Ballet indeed.

Photography by Lexy Potts

How does a moment last forever? Our Pre-Performance Sylvia Talk with Sculptor Linda Klarfeld.

How does a moment last forever? Our Pre-Performance Sylvia Talk with Sculptor Linda Klarfeld.

As audience members, we usually gawk at a dancer’s consecutive turns and flying leaps, but from the perspective of sculptor Linda Klarfeld, it is the intricate and fast-moving positions of a dancer that she wishes to immortalise in bronze. Before our Sylvia Dress Rehearsal performance, we were honoured to have Linda Klarfield, a celebrated Australian sculptor to talk about how she intertwined her artistic gifts and her admiration of ballet in her 6 dance-inspired bronze sculptures. In this talk, her sculptures were brought to life by two talented young students from Allegria Dance Studio.

Her talk detailed her tedious process of sculpting and modelling, of her obsessive observation with the placing of an index finger, or the positioning of a hip bone. Her artworks capture positions that are impossible to hold, as Linda described that her bronze sculptures will stay ‘en pointe’ for 2000 years. As she was never a professional dancer, she leaned on the technical eye of David McAllister and Robert Albert to critique and examine her plasticine sculptures before casting them in rubber/plaster moulds. Using these moulds, she would cast the sculptures in wax and detail any imperfections. At one point, she recalled she had been so obsessive in perfecting the detailing of the hands and materials, she had overlooked that she had cast a dancer with (literally) two left feet. After creating a ceramic mould with the wax sculptures, she would melt out the wax and pour in the bronze.

Bronze is characterized by permanence and strength; hence, Linda relies on it to hold impossible poses with impeccable balance. In her statue of the pas de deux from Giselle, she highlights how her greatest challenge was locating the position’s centre of gravity. In this statue, the ballerina is not yet at the top of her lift, and Linda explains that she located the centre of gravity as being slightly off-centre, as the two dancers pull up and away from each other to maintain balance. We have all seen these lifts in arabesque, with the risen leg stretching through a 90-degree angle, however, the eye always misses the moments before the picture. Linda’s sculptures make that moment tangible to help incite a feeling of excitement about what is about to happen, to bring the sculptures to life in what feels like a real-life pas de deux.

 

This whole process would take around 6 months for every sculpture, however, in every finished result, you can clearly see the admiration and dedication Linda has for her dancers and her art. We thank her for sharing her unique insight into the world of sculpting and ballet with our members, and commend her on her beautiful artworks.

 

Sculptor Linda Klarfeld

 

All photos were taken by Lexy Potts.