An American In Paris

An American In Paris

The Australian Ballet has made the exciting announcement that they, alongside GWB Entertainment, are co-producing An American in Paris in Australia in 2022, in a first-of-its-kind partnership.

An American in Paris is directed and choreographed by Tony Award-winner Christopher Wheeldon, acclaimed international contemporary ballet choreographer. Captivating audiences and critics alike, the production has garnered many accolades including twelve Tony Award nominations, winning the 2015 Tony Award for Best Choreography among other prestigious production awards.

An American in Paris is based off the Gene Kelly-starring 1951 MGM film of the same name and tells the entrancing story of a young American soldier and a beautiful French girl, set against the iconic backdrop of the most romantic city in the world. Wheeldon brings the enchantment and magic of Paris alive on stage with popular songs by George and Ira Gershwin.

David Hallberg said: “An American in Paris has been adapted for the stage by one of the world’s most in-demand choreographers and we have a great and long-standing relationship with Christopher. It’s exciting to be collaborating with him again, but this time on a musical, and we welcome the opportunity for a number of our dancers to perform in this incredible production and broaden their skills as artists.”

The Australian premiere production will tour Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth, Melbourne and Sydney, and will feature Australian Ballet dancers in the cast.

With Australian Ballet dancers joining the cast, An American in Paris will debut to Australian audiences at Brisbane’s QPAC Lyric Theatre in January 2022. It will then go on to play in Adelaide and Perth before arriving at Arts Centre Melbourne’s State Theatre in March, and at Theatre Royal Sydney in April.

Australian Ballet 2022 Season Launch Event

Australian Ballet 2022 Season Launch Event

As a member of our ballet family, you’re invited to join Artistic Director David Hallberg online as he introduces The Australian Ballet’s 2022 Season.

 

David will be joined by some of the most acclaimed international choreographers in the dance world today to talk about new works, followed by an in-depth discussion with Principal Artist Dimity Azoury and Senior Artist Callum Linnane.

Discover the 2022 Season in this must-see free event. Simply click the link below on Tuesday 26 October to watch the announcement.

 

5PM TUESDAY 26 OCTOBER 
CLICK HERE TO JOIN
Friends in Conversation | Elizabeth Toohey

Friends in Conversation | Elizabeth Toohey

In 2017, Elizabeth Toohey accepted David McAllister’s invitation to become a Ballet Mistress and Repetiteur of The Australian Ballet, a vocation near and dear to heart. Earlier this year Elizabeth joined The Friends Chairperson Greg Khoury, to talk about her role in nurturing the company’s dancers, as well as details on her long standing friendship with former Artistic Director David McAllister AC.
Click below to listen.

 

And We Danced

And We Danced

Over the last two years The Australian Ballet has worked with ABC TV on an exciting series that charts the Company’s history. And We Danced reveals the key moments that shaped The Australian Ballet, and tells the story of the people whose passion and dedication continue to drive the Company forward today. Featuring rarely seen footage from The Australian Ballet’s archive, the series also delves into what has made The Ballet so uniquely Australian.

Catch all 3 episodes on iview.

Episode 1, Act 1 1962 – 1979

Australia’s fever for ballet began in the early 20th century with the arrival of the Ballet Russes, who inspired the establishment of Australia’s first professional ballet company – the Borovansky Ballet. Despite outstanding success with audiences, the life of the company was short lived. It wasn’t until the arrival and foresight of British dancer Peggy van Praagh – who took over the sinking company – that the future of ballet in the country looked up.

A successful campaign to government in 1964 led to the establishment of Australia’s first professional dance company: The Australian Ballet. The company’s debut of adored classic Swan Lake was a resounding success, but the early decades were far from smooth sailing. A failed tour to New Zealand, over-worked dancers and industrial action threatened the fledgling company as it tried to carve out its own unique cultural identity.

The early seventies saw the celebrated arrival of a new mode of contemporary dance and the company’s iconic production of Rudolph Nureyev’s Don Quixote, an extravaganza that would herald the greatest ballet film of all time.

Episode 2, Act 2 1980 – 1999

In the 1980s, The Australian Ballet’s audience was broader than ever before. But the long simmering tensions between belt-tightening and creative risk were about to come to a head. In 1981 the dancers staged an iconic strike, demanding to be paid according to skill and rank.

Shortly after, the artistic appointment of British dancer Maina Gielgud finally brought together the creative and business sides of the company. What followed was a harmonious period of rebuilding and a focus on cultivating the company’s many young dancers, such as David McAllister, Steven Heathcote, Elizabeth Toohey and Fiona Tonkin.

Inspired by the company’s youth, the early nineties saw daring, sexy and provocative ballets that pushed the limits of physicality and tradition. Spartacus, and Stanton Welch’s Divergence showed a new edge and revolutionised the ballet’s public image.

The period also saw the arrival of Australia’s most highly regarded choreographer Graeme Murphy and the company’s first collaboration with choreographer Stephen Page of Bangarra Dance Company.

Ross Stretton took over the artistic direction in 1997. Remote and reclusive, his approach was not endeared by some, though no one could deny his artistic strengths. By the end of the decade, the repertoire was becoming increasingly contemporary, increasingly Australian and increasingly risky.

Episode 3, Act 1 2000 – 2020

In the third and final episode of And We Danced, The Australian Ballet enters the new millennium with a bold creative appointment. Fresh from the dancer’s ranks and with no prior leadership experience, David McAllister became artistic director of The Australian Ballet in 2001.

His daring first commission was Graeme Murphy’s adaptation of Swan Lake, inspired by the love triangle between Princess Diana, Prince Charles and Camilla. It was an unprecedented success, becoming a signature piece for the company and securing the future of the company in McAllister’s hands.

Further collaborations with Stephen Page and Bangarra Dance Company, and the recruitment of Ella Halvelka, The Australian Ballet’s first Indigenous dancer, cemented the company’s commitment to represent a diversity of stories and cultures that reflect Australian society more widely.

With success of large-scale crowd-pleasers such as Alice in Wonderland and Sleeping Beauty alongside more experimental works it appeared that the balance between financial viability and creative risk had been struck.

After twenty years at the helm of the company, McAllister propelled The Australian Ballet into the 21st century on and off the stage. In 2021, ballet’s popularity is as great as ever. With the recent appointment of international superstar David Hallberg as the eighth Artistic Director the ballet looks forward to a new future as one of our preeminent cultural institutions.

 

DanceX

DanceX

AN UNMISSABLE FESTIVAL OF DANCE
MELBOURNE 24 SEPT – 2 OCT

This September, dance companies from around Australia will gather at Arts Centre Melbourne for a festival experience like no other.

DanceX is a brand new, two-part festival conceived and curated by The Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director David Hallberg that will showcase the depth, range and diversity of the nation’s dance community. Bringing audiences brand new commissions, Australian premieres and excerpts from some of the most popular dance works of the last year, DanceX is an unmissable experience for culture-lovers of all kinds.

Eight companies – The Australian Ballet, Bangarra Dance Theatre, Sydney Dance Company, Chunky Move, Lucy Guerin Inc, Australian Dance Theatre, Queensland Ballet and West Australian Ballet – will perform in two parts, marking the first coming-together of these companies in many years.

The Australian Ballet will perform in both parts, presenting the Australian premiere of Johan Inger’s comic, romantic dance theatre piece I New Then, set to songs by Van Morrison; Inger, a Swedish choreographer, danced with Nederlands Dans Theater and has made works for leading companies all over Europe.

DanceX is an opportunity for audiences to experience diverse works from Australia’s leading dance companies, celebrating and paying tribute to the richness of Australia’s dance community. As well as initiating and presenting DanceX, The Australian Ballet has commissioned two companies, Chunky Move and Lucy Guerin Inc, to create brand new works.

 

PART ONE | 24 – 27 SEPTEMBER

The Australian Ballet | New Then A comic, romantic dance theatre piece set to songs by Van Morrison.

Queensland Ballet | Glass Concerto An assemblage of high energy, dynamic and emotional movement, Glass Concerto will captivate and inspire audiences.

Sydney Dance Company | ab [intra] (excerpt) From tenderness to turmoil, ab [intra] is a journey through the intensity of human existence that will command your attention.

Lucy Guerin Inc | How To Be Us* A duet for two women on the limits of freedom.

Bangarra Dance Theatre | Ochres and Walkabout (excerpts) Three powerful, spiritual and grounded excerts from Bangarra’s seminal works Ochres (1995) and Walkabout (2002).

Duration: approx. 146 mins (including two intervals)

 

PART TWO | 30 SEPTEMBER – 2 OCTOBER

Australian Dance Theatre | The Beginning of Nature (excerpt) The Beginning of Nature explores the complex symphony of overlapping rhythms that constitute the very fabric of nature.

Chunky Move | AB_TA_ Response* AB_TA_Response explores the rhythm of forms between dance and design and considers the dialogue between biological and technological systems.

West Australian Ballet | 4Seasons The stages of life and love – the youth of spring, storms of summer, tenderness of autumn and the aging of winter.

The Australian Ballet | New Then A comic, romantic dance theatre piece set to songs by Van Morrison.

Duration: approx. 124 mins (including two intervals)

*commissioned by The Australian Ballet

LEARN MORE

Telstra Emerging Choreographer

Telstra Emerging Choreographer

After the sad news that The Australian Ballet are postponing their Melbourne season of New York Dialects, Artistic Director David Hallberg has made an exciting announcement.

Together with Telstra, The Australian Ballet are creating the Telstra Emerging Choreographer (TEC) award, a new pathway for emerging Australian choreographers in all dance styles to develop their skills and foster their talent.

The TEC will give up to four aspiring choreographers the opportunity to create a new work; the winner will be featured in The Ballet’s 2022 Bodytorque program and receive a cash prize of $10,000.

The award is open to all forms of dance, not just ballet. When discussing the initiate Hallberg said ‘I think part of my role and responsibility is to continue to stay a really active participant in the dance world, and the art world, here in Australia, and get to know it well. The community of dance should always be inclusive.’ Part of his vision for the company “is to open up our doors to other creators that aren’t necessarily ballet creators”.

Applications close 13 July, with the winner announced during the Bodytorque season in Melbourne this October.