Need more ballet?

ABC TV now has a stunning selection of The Australian Ballet’s favourite performances available to stream free on iview for a limited time.

The Merry Widow

The Merry Widow is a lively tale of love, money and class, played out against the glitter and opulence of the Belle Epoque. View here

 

 

 

Spartacus

 Set in Roman times, this production by Lucas Jervies follows the exploits of Spartacus, the rebellious leader of a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. View here

 

 

Warumuk – in the dark night

A collaboration between Bangarra Dance Theatre and The Australian Ballet, Warumuk – in the dark night takes its inspiration from traditional Aboriginal stories. View here

 

 

 

Coppélia

A sparkling tale of magic and mischief, Coppélia has everything a good story ballet should: enchantment, romance and sumptuous costumes. View here

 

 

 

Cinderella

Alexei Ratmansky’s Cinderella has all the elements of the story we love – a feisty heroine, a dashing prince, a kindly godmother and a wicked stepmother. View here

 

 

Sleeping Beauty

With lavish sets and costumes, this David McAllister ballet casts a spell of delight all the way to true love’s kiss. View here

 

 

 

Dyad 1929

Wayne McGregor’s Dyad 1929 tests the limits of classical movement in a laboratory-white set, and features an electrifying score by Steve Reich. View here

 

 

Paquita

Choreography by Marius Petipa, Paquita is full of spectacular turns, extravagant tutus, exuberant leaps and delicate footwork. View here

 

 

 

Romeo & Juliet

Graeme Murphy’s Romeo & Juliet captures the implacable hate of rival families, the joy and tenderness of first love and the poignancy of its end. View here

 

 

 

 

 

La Sylphide

La Sylphide is a ballet that tells the tale of a Scottish dreamer who is fascinated by a woodland sprite and spurns his fiancée to follow her. View here

Vale Jane Douglass AM

Jane Douglass AM, a great advocate for the performing arts, passed away on Monday 19 July. Some members may remember Jane for her role in organising the 2009 premiere of Mao’s Last Dancer in Sydney for The Friends.

Greg Khoury, FAB Chair, has shared a touching tribute to Jane.

From Greg Khoury

It is with much sadness that I advise that Jane Douglass AM died peacefully in Sydney surrounded by her family.

Some of you will remember Jane and her husband Gordon.

Jane and Gordon were great advocates of the live arts, dance and ballet in particular. Jane and Gordon were instrumental in the production of the film of Don Quixote in July 1973, considered to this day to be the best film of a ballet ever. The world premiere was also the first event in the Sydney Opera House and the first official event of the Friends of The Australian Ballet (NSW).

In 2009, I had the great pleasure of working alongside Jane Douglass when at Kenneth’s invitation she agreed to take up the Chair of Mao’s Last Dancer Gala Committee with other stalwart supporters including Vicki Jones and Ros Packer.  The Premiere at the State Theatre and Gala Reception at the Swissotel raised more money in one night than we had raised in 4 years and was hugely enjoyed and a great profile builder which showed how well FAB could drive a major event with the right people at the fore.

Personally, I had great satisfaction in working with Jane Douglass and her circle of indefatigable, uncompromising women, each of whom brough their own flair, style and elan, expertise and humour to the table. I have several wonderful stories!! Jane became affectionally known as “Chairman Mao”!

Jane was known for her determination, stoicism and conviction all underpinned by her love of the Ballet and the Company. She was a generous supporter at all levels. She was a force of nature and I admired and respected her, and enjoyed a continuing friendship with her ever since. Her daughter Sybella has taken on the mantle of her mother and father and is a lover and supporter of the Company alongside her own charities for women that she supports.

We extend to Sybella, her brother Hamish and Jane’s entire family our condolences. We have lost an extraordinary woman with a grand, independent spirit who also had an immediacy and naturalness that I and all her knew Jane, shall miss.

And We Danced

And We Danced

Over the last two years The Australian Ballet has worked with ABC TV on an exciting series that charts the Company’s history. And We Danced reveals the key moments that shaped The Australian Ballet, and tells the story of the people whose passion and dedication continue to drive the Company forward today. Featuring rarely seen footage from The Australian Ballet’s archive, the series also delves into what has made The Ballet so uniquely Australian.

Catch Episode 1 and 2 on iview and the final episode 9pm Wednesday 28 July on ABC TV Plus or iview.

Episode 1, Act 1 1962 – 1979

Australia’s fever for ballet began in the early 20th century with the arrival of the Ballet Russes, who inspired the establishment of Australia’s first professional ballet company – the Borovansky Ballet. Despite outstanding success with audiences, the life of the company was short lived. It wasn’t until the arrival and foresight of British dancer Peggy van Praagh – who took over the sinking company – that the future of ballet in the country looked up.

A successful campaign to government in 1964 led to the establishment of Australia’s first professional dance company: The Australian Ballet. The company’s debut of adored classic Swan Lake was a resounding success, but the early decades were far from smooth sailing. A failed tour to New Zealand, over-worked dancers and industrial action threatened the fledgling company as it tried to carve out its own unique cultural identity.

The early seventies saw the celebrated arrival of a new mode of contemporary dance and the company’s iconic production of Rudolph Nureyev’s Don Quixote, an extravaganza that would herald the greatest ballet film of all time.

Episode 2, Act 2 1980 – 1999

In the 1980s, The Australian Ballet’s audience was broader than ever before. But the long simmering tensions between belt-tightening and creative risk were about to come to a head. In 1981 the dancers staged an iconic strike, demanding to be paid according to skill and rank.

Shortly after, the artistic appointment of British dancer Maina Gielgud finally brought together the creative and business sides of the company. What followed was a harmonious period of rebuilding and a focus on cultivating the company’s many young dancers, such as David McAllister, Steven Heathcote, Elizabeth Toohey and Fiona Tonkin.

Inspired by the company’s youth, the early nineties saw daring, sexy and provocative ballets that pushed the limits of physicality and tradition. Spartacus, and Stanton Welch’s Divergence showed a new edge and revolutionised the ballet’s public image.

The period also saw the arrival of Australia’s most highly regarded choreographer Graeme Murphy and the company’s first collaboration with choreographer Stephen Page of Bangarra Dance Company.

Ross Stretton took over the artistic direction in 1997. Remote and reclusive, his approach was not endeared by some, though no one could deny his artistic strengths. By the end of the decade, the repertoire was becoming increasingly contemporary, increasingly Australian and increasingly risky.

DanceX

DanceX

AN UNMISSABLE FESTIVAL OF DANCE
MELBOURNE 24 SEPT – 2 OCT

This September, dance companies from around Australia will gather at Arts Centre Melbourne for a festival experience like no other.

DanceX is a brand new, two-part festival conceived and curated by The Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director David Hallberg that will showcase the depth, range and diversity of the nation’s dance community. Bringing audiences brand new commissions, Australian premieres and excerpts from some of the most popular dance works of the last year, DanceX is an unmissable experience for culture-lovers of all kinds.

Eight companies – The Australian Ballet, Bangarra Dance Theatre, Sydney Dance Company, Chunky Move, Lucy Guerin Inc, Australian Dance Theatre, Queensland Ballet and West Australian Ballet – will perform in two parts, marking the first coming-together of these companies in many years.

The Australian Ballet will perform in both parts, presenting the Australian premiere of Johan Inger’s comic, romantic dance theatre piece I New Then, set to songs by Van Morrison; Inger, a Swedish choreographer, danced with Nederlands Dans Theater and has made works for leading companies all over Europe.

DanceX is an opportunity for audiences to experience diverse works from Australia’s leading dance companies, celebrating and paying tribute to the richness of Australia’s dance community. As well as initiating and presenting DanceX, The Australian Ballet has commissioned two companies, Chunky Move and Lucy Guerin Inc, to create brand new works.

 

PART ONE | 24 – 27 SEPTEMBER

The Australian Ballet | New Then A comic, romantic dance theatre piece set to songs by Van Morrison.

Queensland Ballet | Glass Concerto An assemblage of high energy, dynamic and emotional movement, Glass Concerto will captivate and inspire audiences.

Sydney Dance Company | ab [intra] (excerpt) From tenderness to turmoil, ab [intra] is a journey through the intensity of human existence that will command your attention.

Lucy Guerin Inc | How To Be Us* A duet for two women on the limits of freedom.

Bangarra Dance Theatre | Ochres and Walkabout (excerpts) Three powerful, spiritual and grounded excerts from Bangarra’s seminal works Ochres (1995) and Walkabout (2002).

Duration: approx. 146 mins (including two intervals)

 

PART TWO | 30 SEPTEMBER – 2 OCTOBER

Australian Dance Theatre | The Beginning of Nature (excerpt) The Beginning of Nature explores the complex symphony of overlapping rhythms that constitute the very fabric of nature.

Chunky Move | AB_TA_ Response* AB_TA_Response explores the rhythm of forms between dance and design and considers the dialogue between biological and technological systems.

West Australian Ballet | 4Seasons The stages of life and love – the youth of spring, storms of summer, tenderness of autumn and the aging of winter.

The Australian Ballet | New Then A comic, romantic dance theatre piece set to songs by Van Morrison.

Duration: approx. 124 mins (including two intervals)

*commissioned by The Australian Ballet

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Five Reasons to see Le Parc

Five Reasons to see Le Parc

Created specifically for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1994 by choreographer Angelin Preljocal, there are countless reasons why Le Parc has become a timeless classic.

CARDS
When desire is part of the game, the carte du Tendre is also a card to play. Love at first sight and gambles come together in the groves of Le Parc. Marivaux like, Preljocaj’s choreography – created in 1994 for the Paris Opera Ballet – reshuffles the cards for the game of love and chance.

MOZART
Female desire (Così fan tutte), debauchery (Don Giovanni) and true love (Die Zauberflöte): Mozart’s scores form the soundtrack for the century of Laclos, Sade, Crébillon and Vivant Denon. In Le Parc, Mozart is Preljocaj’s musical accomplice: concertos, quartets and symphonies give rhythm to a work that gives form to the desires of the heart and mind.

GARDENS
Be it the gardens of the carte du Tendre – the landscape of love charted out by Madame de Scudéry or the royal alleys at Versailles where Le Nôtre created the ideal backdrop for all things playful, the garden is above all a secret one when it comes to love.

QUARTET
“Divertimento”, “A Musical Joke”, “Serenade”, “A little Night Music”: the pages from Mozart selected by Angelin Preljocaj evoke hours of the day and night – moments in a sophisticated art of loving. Music and dance echo one another: in a conversation transposed into sound, a quartet of gardeners reply to a string quartet. Set to an electronic score by Goran Vejvoda, these little cupids guide the dancers along in a timeless game.

ERA
The society of the age of Enlightenment has given way to an entertainment based one: “The world parades and surges across the small screen”, says Preljocaj, “and we remain transfixed”. And yet, as the French writer Philippe Sollers says, the 18th century was a “forward” one. With Le Parc, the choreographer draws on the source of French libertinage. Dance finds new momentum that brings into perspective the games of seduction of our times.

“A masterpiece. There are dances that entertain us, and then there are a few that have the power to truly move us.” Alexandra Desvignes, BACHTRACK

Join ballet aficionado Leo Schofield for a pre-screening presentation of Le Parc on 18 July at Palace Cinemas Verona to hear why Leo thinks Le Parc is a masterpiece of dance.

Tickets on sale now

BOOK TICKETS NOW

Image courtesy Paris Opera Ballet